The “Good” Student

            According to “Against Common Sense, Chapter 2”, by Kumashiro being a “good” student means, “to be the kind of students that schools and society often tell them to be” (pg. 21). Society seems to think that to be a “good” student you have to get good grades, listen to instructions, attend all classes, and the list could go on and on but this isn’t the reality for most students. This chapter talks about a kid M and the teacher’s realization that lots of students are like M and have struggles with focusing and sticking to a structured lesson. With this being said lots of students don’t fit in with the “good” student stereotype. The teacher in this chapter felt pressure to try and turn students into being the product of a “good” student by the end of the school year.

            There are students that are more privileged to fitting the definition of a good student. These students would be the ones that have more privileges from there parents such as, having money, lots of time with their parents and family after school, having a cultural background accepted by society and many more. The list of white privileges by Peggy Macintosh is a concept that still applies to students today even though it is wrong. The kids that have grown up with more privileged are going to find it much easy to become the student that schools want.

            With these common sense ideas, it is almost impossible to see that all students are going to have difficulties learning in different subject areas or with different methods. With this being said there should be no definition of a “good” student since all students will struggle if different areas. Also, this definition shouldn’t exist because all students are like M and they shouldn’t be told that they are a bad student by society because of the way they learn.

Refernces

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1kkJc7k2AyKB-Usl3pujiMAeWpfzmpZRK/view

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